thesexosaurus:

"Condoms don’t work."

"Your first time is supposed to hurt."

"It’s not really sex if there’s no penetration."

"Girls don’t masturbate."

image

(via xingaderas)

as-warm-as-choco:

jonnnyariga:

uh Hi everyone!! i know this is  kind of out of no where but this is my good friend Ashley. I love her so much and she’s such a fun,loving person, and she needs help. She’s been fighting aplastic anemia for over 2 years and she recently lost her hair due to chemotherapy, and she’s only 15. For those of you who don’t know, aplastic anemia is a condition in the bone marrow where its unable to make enough white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Its very similar to leukemia. It has caused her to miss a numerous amount of school, and she has had to undergo many surgeries and doctors appointments. In fact, she is unable to return to school for the rest of the year. she’s been gone since December.

Because of her condition, she can’t be out in the sun, take the stairs, and she gets very nauseous easily. If she has to be outside for a long time, she needs a wheelchair. At school I had to ride the elevator with her and make sure she was okay every so often.

Unfortunately, her family is unable to pay for the treatment she desperately needs. I don’t know if this will work, but I was hoping that if i posted this, some people on tumblr would help donate. The money would go towards a bone marrow transplant. It costs $10,000 and so far they have only made about $1,300.

Please im asking this as her friend and someone who cares about her. If you could just signal boost this or even donate a dollar it would mean so much to me and her family as well.

Donation for Transplant

Facebook Page

There’s only about a month left until this campaign closes so please help.

Thank you so much.

REBLOG THIS ! You can save Ashley’s life… I know we can do it ! It’s only $10,000… It’s nothing for tumblr ! WHERE ARE THE NOTES!

(Source: kurutakura, via officerpecks)

http://misandry-mermaid.tumblr.com/post/83353464213/imintheskywithpie-solely-opinionated

imintheskywithpie:

solely-opinionated:

squeaksquawk:

jokes about Dylan Sprouse’s nudes make me uncomfortable b/c women get their lives and careers ruined or tainted if something like this comes out but dylan gets commended for “handling it well”

Give me one actual example of…

third-eyes:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

(via spiderswantcastotapdance)

ruffiansonships:

This was the greatest moment ever.

(Source: rubyredwisp, via argonboron)

teroknortailor:

boi-interrupted:

luxuryon:

How to build a dome

All Photos © Steve Areen

This is awesome.

this is some tattooine level shit right here

(via mustlovemerlin)

my future child: tell me a bedtime story
me: once upon a time, in nazi-occupied france...

angrywocunited:

[Trigger Warning: This video contains discussions on sexual slavery, abuse, rape, and violence]

COMFORT WOMEN WANTED, a very short documentary filmed by Chang-Jin Lee discussing the lives of Korean, Chinese, Taiwanese, Indonesian, Filipino, and Dutch “Comfort Women” survivors, and a former Japanese soldier. Comfort Women comprised of 200,000 young women and girls, referred to as “Comfort Women,” who were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese Imperial Army. The title, COMFORT WOMEN WANTED, is a reference to the actual text of advertisements which appeared in Asian newspapers during the war. When advertising failed, young women and girls from Korea, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, and the Netherlands were kidnapped or deceived then forced into sexual slavery. These women and girls were raped and beaten by 50-100 soldiers a day at military rape camps, known as “Comfort Stations.” There are estimations that only 30% survived the ordeal. The “Comfort Women System” is considered the largest case of human trafficking in the 20th century. The remaining Comfort Women are now in their 80s/90s still waiting for a formal apology from the Japanese government, which has attempted to suppress, silence, and erase the issue to the extent of protesting the Comfort Woman statue. Just recently, the imbeciles at Gawking’s Valleywag published an article called “Start-up Flying Dateable Women to San Francisco Like It’s Imperial Japan” essentially trivializing and romanticizing the experiences of Comfort Women and stating it’s “inspiration” from the Comfort Women of World War Two. Many Asian and Asian American readers demanded the removal of the article and an apology. But the writer, Nitasha, wrote a lazy apology instead of constructing an in depth apology, and the article is STILL on their websiteDespite the growing awareness of the issue, this aspect of history has been at most unacknowledged. In this documentary, Chang-Jin Lee attempts to bring light on the organized violence against Comfort Women, and to create a constructive dialogue for the future by acknowledging their place in history. 

 

(via thisisnotjapan)

chescaleigh:

blackpowerisforblackmen:


Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.
Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition

Don’t just reblog, make sure to sign!

chescaleigh:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.

Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition

Don’t just reblog, make sure to sign!

(via mustlovemerlin)


When Jews lived in the Soviet Union, they had to hide their matzah in suitcases
When people can’t practice their religion, they often resort to secret measures. That’s what happened for Jews living in the Soviet Union, after World War II.
When the war ended, a new strain of anti-Semitism rose up. The secret police would station themselves outside synagogues to intimidate people, says Jeffrey Veidlinger, a professor of Judaic studies and history at the University of Michigan.
“You might not be thrown in jail, but your life would be made difficult,” he says, “so Jewish practice mostly moved into the home.”
And that included the making of matzah, the flat, dry crackers that Jewish people eat to commemorate the eight days of Passover.
“If you were Jewish, you definitely didn’t have all the privileges of everybody else,” says Vitaly Paley, a restaurant owner in Portland who was born in the Soviet city of Gomel, now in Belarus. “People feared for their safety if they were to practice religion, but they managed to retain their food traditions, and through food, they retained that religious practice.”
Slava Frumkin, who was born in the Smolensk region in the Soviet Union, says Jewish people there generally didn’t hold Seders, the traditional Passover meal.
“That’s why it was important to have matzah,” he says.
“Matzah became embedded within Jewish identity,” says Veidlinger. “In 1956, they cracked down a bit and explicitly forbade the baking of matzah inside synagogues. And there were homes that, every year, kind of turned into makeshift bakeries around Passover.”
“In our area,” says Frumkin, “it was one home, and we would deliver the flour to the home. It was like a well-oiled machine — all the family members running and doing different things. But no matter what, in one hour you would get your matzahs.”
“By some reason, everybody used pillowcases, stacking this matzahs in the pillowcases. Then we would bring it home, and we had a special suitcase.”
Paley says it was important the suitcase stayed closed until the family brought it into their home. “[They] would bring it in and open it up, and there would be this wad of matzah in there. The matzah was well hidden from anybody else that could see it, for sure.”
“You have to understand,” Frumkin says. “It was, like, a sense of secrecy around this, and it was filling to some degree with some pride, your heart. You’re doing something secretly what the government doesn’t want.”
Veidlinger says the secrecy heightened the importance of the holiday. “If they had just allowed the factories to make matzah, people could have just gone to purchase matzah,” he says.
That’s what they did when they left the Soviet Union and crossed into the free world, Paley says. “If we wanted matzah, we could just buy it openly and eat it on the street. I mean, how cool was that? For the Jewish people, once we traveled here, we could practice our religion in peace and harmony — and matzah is the symbol of that.”
But “when you have plenty freedom, and you have plenty matzah, and everything is plentiful, the value is somewhat different,” Frumkin says. “When you have to work for this, it changes the taste to some degree. To me, it was always a treat. I loved matzah.”

When Jews lived in the Soviet Union, they had to hide their matzah in suitcases

When people can’t practice their religion, they often resort to secret measures. That’s what happened for Jews living in the Soviet Union, after World War II.

When the war ended, a new strain of anti-Semitism rose up. The secret police would station themselves outside synagogues to intimidate people, says Jeffrey Veidlinger, a professor of Judaic studies and history at the University of Michigan.

“You might not be thrown in jail, but your life would be made difficult,” he says, “so Jewish practice mostly moved into the home.”

And that included the making of matzah, the flat, dry crackers that Jewish people eat to commemorate the eight days of Passover.

“If you were Jewish, you definitely didn’t have all the privileges of everybody else,” says Vitaly Paley, a restaurant owner in Portland who was born in the Soviet city of Gomel, now in Belarus. “People feared for their safety if they were to practice religion, but they managed to retain their food traditions, and through food, they retained that religious practice.”

Slava Frumkin, who was born in the Smolensk region in the Soviet Union, says Jewish people there generally didn’t hold Seders, the traditional Passover meal.

“That’s why it was important to have matzah,” he says.

“Matzah became embedded within Jewish identity,” says Veidlinger. “In 1956, they cracked down a bit and explicitly forbade the baking of matzah inside synagogues. And there were homes that, every year, kind of turned into makeshift bakeries around Passover.”

“In our area,” says Frumkin, “it was one home, and we would deliver the flour to the home. It was like a well-oiled machine — all the family members running and doing different things. But no matter what, in one hour you would get your matzahs.”

“By some reason, everybody used pillowcases, stacking this matzahs in the pillowcases. Then we would bring it home, and we had a special suitcase.”

Paley says it was important the suitcase stayed closed until the family brought it into their home. “[They] would bring it in and open it up, and there would be this wad of matzah in there. The matzah was well hidden from anybody else that could see it, for sure.”

“You have to understand,” Frumkin says. “It was, like, a sense of secrecy around this, and it was filling to some degree with some pride, your heart. You’re doing something secretly what the government doesn’t want.”

Veidlinger says the secrecy heightened the importance of the holiday. “If they had just allowed the factories to make matzah, people could have just gone to purchase matzah,” he says.

That’s what they did when they left the Soviet Union and crossed into the free world, Paley says. “If we wanted matzah, we could just buy it openly and eat it on the street. I mean, how cool was that? For the Jewish people, once we traveled here, we could practice our religion in peace and harmony — and matzah is the symbol of that.”

But “when you have plenty freedom, and you have plenty matzah, and everything is plentiful, the value is somewhat different,” Frumkin says. “When you have to work for this, it changes the taste to some degree. To me, it was always a treat. I loved matzah.”

(via lo-vedove)